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[Released] Gossamer Gear ‘LT5’ Three Piece Carbon Trekking Poles

with 13 comments

Greetings Adventurers!

Gossamer Gear has introduced a new trekking pole, called the “LT5”, which is a three piece carbon fiber pole.

Many years ago I tried (and had no success) in making a three piece GG trekking pole (they sent me a bunch of hardware and poles and extra parts and such) and they had tried for a few years prior to that, so it is really nice to see that Gossamer Gear has worked out the manufacturing process to make a 3-piece trekking pole.

The nice thing about a three piece pole is that it can compact down to a smaller/shorter size, making it easier to air travel with, not having it stick up above your backpack, and making it useful for being a support pole on shelters that use/require a very short support pole.

Trekking Pole Specs:

Based on their website the LT5 has a shortened length of 60 cm (23.5 inches)

When fully extended (for hiking) they are spec’ed at 130 cm (51″ inches)

Now compare that to the LT4 poles at 88 cm (34.6 inches) min and 140 cm (55 inches) max.

So the new LT5 poles are a full 28 cm (11.02 inches) shorter than the LT4’s when stored in your backpack side pocket!!

The weight specs for the LT5, as of the time of this being published is:

Pole with strap and basket – 5.3 oz / 150 g
Pole – 4.6 oz / 130 g
Strap and screw .- 4 oz / 12 g
Basket – .3 oz / 8 g

 

External Twist Lock!

But perhaps the biggest news in all of this is the fact that Gossamer Gear has finally made the switch (at least for these LT5’s) to an external locking system!

This is super great news. Soooo many hikers (myself included) that I know stopped using the LT4 trekking poles due to frustration from the locking system on the LT4 poles.

While maybe not the uber awesomeness of a Flip-lock locking system, at least by going to an external twist locking system, Gossamer Gear is hopefully going to have a bazillion times better locking system than the internal twist locking system that has been using for the last decade or two.

Take a look at this zoomed in / cropped photo:

Where To Buy:

The price for a pair of them (not sold individually at this time) is: $195.00

Directly from the Gossamer Gear LT5 website page.

https://gossamergear.com/lt5.html

This was originally published on my patreon page at: https://www.patreon.com/posts/8484019 – become a patron for some early access and exclusive content.

Written by John B. Abela - HikeLighter.Com

March 24, 2017 at 11:23 am

13 Responses

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  1. I loved my LT4’s, but like you, over time the locking mechanism frustration got the best of me and I sold them off.

    Stick

    March 24, 2017 at 11:40 am

    • John, thank you for this overview!

      3-4 years ago I really wanted to buy those light and amazing poles by GG. But now after I bought Locus Gear CP3 carbon poles at half the price of GG and lately Fizan Compact 3 aluminium poles at $65 on Massdrop delivered to Israel, I can’t find a reason to spend $200 on poles. All these I mentioned here come at the same weight (almost – less than 300 gram for a pair), I love Fizan poles more. They are more stable and don’t have that rattle noise (like in Locus Gear CP3) when you hit ground (normal pole usage).
      Today there are more and more cheaper and still very good poles. I think the cork grips of GG poles are better, hence there are folks who ordered just the grips and glued them to their poles. Maybe I’ll do it too.

      thehikingdad

      March 24, 2017 at 11:52 am

      • I noticed these on the GG website because I was over there looking at their LT3C poles which I have been seriously considering buying.

        I think there are a great many long distance hikers that have grown frustrated over the years of the GG internal locking mechanisms, so the really great thing in all of this is to see GG finally make the move to an external locking mechanism.

        And, as you mentioned, there has been a growing market for light weight poles in the last few years, but there is still a massive and very loyal group of hikers that like the Gossamer Gear trekking poles, and for good reasons!

        John B. Abela

        March 24, 2017 at 12:02 pm

  2. John, any thoughts/insight into what appears to be a new wrist strap?

    Bungzy

    March 24, 2017 at 2:49 pm

  3. John, have you checked out Helinox poles? I have used these for a few years now. 150g each and three piece. I have tried carbon, but not as strong.

    Rob McKay

    March 25, 2017 at 12:43 pm

    • Hey Rob,

      I do not think that I have heard of them. As you know, I gave up using trekking poles a few years back, 2013 IIRC. The single zpacks staff has been about the only thing I have used since mid-2014.

      I have only been thinking about getting a GG LT3C just so I can have something for easy little trips or when I just want something small.

      In my 10’ish years of ultralight backpacking I do not think I have used any non carbon fiber hiking poles, so just not something I can compare.

      John B. Abela

      March 25, 2017 at 1:24 pm

  4. I just got a pair of the LT5’s.

    They are still using an internal twist locking mechanism, though it looks like the mechanism is different than that of the LT4’s.

    The handles (like the LT4’s I think) are foam that looks like cork.

    Tarn

    April 19, 2017 at 3:52 pm

    • >> They are still using an internal twist locking mechanism, though it looks like the mechanism is different than that of the LT4’s.

      crap, for real? than what in the hehe is that external part highlighted in the zoom’ed photo above?

      • The external part looks to be a reinforcing piece that’s glued to the end of the top and middle sections.

        The internal twist lock mechanism consists of:
        – The threaded metal “bolt”
        – A plastic spring clip at the top of the bolt in it’s own slot to keep the other parts from becoming unscrewed
        – A longer than usual (over 1″) threaded red plastic expander w/ 4 cuts to allow it to expand
        – A tapered white plastic spreader tube at the bottom of the bolt which forces the expander to expand and can rotate freely, separate from threads so it doesn’t move up/down
        – A (brass?) metal piece inserted through one side of the carbon fiber tube to lock the bolt in place and make sure it doesn’t rotate

        All in all it looks pretty carefully thought out. I’ve never used the LT4’s, so I’m just hoping the LT5’s are an improvement over the LT4 mechanism. Definitely an improvement over my old Komperdell Carbon One’s that I’m finally retiring.

        I’ll be taking them out in a week or two and will try to post how it goes. Given the weather and season here they will probably see plenty of water, mud, and snow.

        Tarn

        April 19, 2017 at 5:08 pm

  5. Alpkit carbonlite looks very similar. I used them last summer in the north of Sweden and they were really great.

    https://www.alpkit.com/products/carbonlite-pairlooks

    Ola

    April 21, 2017 at 12:08 pm

  6. I’ve had the LT5 poles for over a month now, and used them for 12 days in sun, rain, wind, snow, mud, on granite, in rivers, etc. They’ve worked well for me.

    I had the locking mechanism slip on the first day but after slightly tightening it I had no more slips, despite putting quite a bit of my weight on them from time to time. I have gotten back into the habit of twisting the poles clockwise while the tips are on the ground occasionally which helps keep them locked tight.

    The tips seem reasonably grippy, similar to my Black Diamond poles. I may try to touch up the carbide with some diamond files.

    The small snowflake shaped baskets they come with are small and light but catch on brush easily. GG told me that Leki baskets should fit the threading, but none of my Leki baskets did. GG then sent me (for free!) some smaller non-snowflake shaped baskets that work well and don’t catch on brush as much. I need the baskets since I hike on lots of muddy, swampy, or soft forest duff terrain where poles without baskets can sink deep.

    The straps work well, though my carpal tunnel wrists wish they were slightly wider.

    One concern I have is the tops of the grips. The bolt that holds the straps is set in a hole in the top of the grips that is over 1/4 inch deep. I often change grips to have my palm against the top of the grips when hitting a brief steep section going down. With that hole, the top of the grips has been weakened and I can feel it bend and compress. A solution might be to replace the bolt with a slightly longer bolt that runs through a plastic spacer filling most of the hole. Don’t know if I’ll try that mod.

    Tarn

    June 10, 2017 at 1:48 pm

    • Thanks for letting us know how things are going for you with the LT5 poles!

      Here in the Redwoods the ground is usually somewhere between soft and downright muddy, so I just always keep the very small baskets on my poles, as it helps keep them from sinking in.


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