Six Moon Designs introduced Carbon Fiber Sun Umbrella

Carbon Fiber Handle & Ribs of the Six Moon Design ‘Silver Shadow Carbon’ Umbrella

Our good friends over at Six Moon Designs have brought to market two new sun umbrellas made with carbon fiber, to help reduce weight of our favorite sun umbrellas.

In addition to the standard ‘Silver Shadow‘, which is the old ‘Chromedome’ umbrella, Six Moon Designs now offers the ‘Silver Shadow Carbon‘ and the ‘Silver Shadow Mini‘.

The weight difference between the standard and the carbon version is 59 grams (2.08 ounces) and there is a price difference of $20.00

For the Silver Shadow Carbon both the handle and the ribs are carbon fiber.

For the Silver Shadow Mini only the ribs are carbon fiber. ūüė•

Back in 2016 I published an article on the Montbell ‘Sun Block Umbrella‘, which is the “baby chromedome”, or, the “mini” as Six Moon Designs calls it.

The differences between the Montbell version and this new one from Six Moon Designs is that the ribs are carbon fiber, and the Shadow Mini is $10.00 less than the Montbell version.

Specs:

Silver Shadow:  $25.00
Weight: 252 grams (8.89 ounces)
Length: 25 inches (63.5 cm).
Open Width: 37 inches (94 cm)

Silver Shadow Carbon:  $45.00
Weight: 193 grams (6.80 ounces)
Length: 25 inches (63.5 cm).
Open Width: 37 inches (94 cm)

Silver Shadow Mini: $35.00
Weight: 193 grams (6.80 ounces)
Length: 10 inches (25.4 cm).
Open Width: 38 inches (96.5 cm)

Thoughts:

I was a fan of the large size chromedome umbrellas for many years. Than I discovered the Montbell baby size version and it quickly became my umbrella of choice.

While setup/takedown does require a bit more work, the smaller pack size just appealed to me.

When one figures they might hike thousands of miles and only use an umbrella for a few hundred, the smaller pack size makes more sense, to me at least.

That said, a few of my friends that are triple crowners have tried using the mini/baby montbell version and have had it break on them. While I have never had that happen, just something to keep in mind; it is less durable then the full size umbrella.

Of course, one should also remember that on trips where you plan on having a whole lot of sun beating down on you (pct, cdt, arizona trail, etc) wearing some high quality sun protective garments is also highly advisable. Melanoma is no joke, cover yourself folks!

Advertisements

Six Moon Designs ‘Minimalist’ Backpack, Initial Look

youtube_thumbnail

Greetings Adventurers!

A couple months ago I was up at the Six Moon Designs offices, just South of Portland Oregon. While I was there I had a chance to check out their latest backpack, the ‘Minimalist‘ – and they even allowed me to¬†share¬†a picture¬†of it on my Instagram page.

They asked me if I would like to try one out when they got in stock and I said sure, of course, testing out new packs on the market is something that I love to do. So a few weeks later one showed up at my house. Free of charge, which is always cool. It is super rare for me to accept free gear, but at the same time, there are just so many new packs on the market right now that buying all of them has gotten to be too blasted expensive. Thankfully a few friends have sent me a few backpacks to do some testing with (such as when I did the initial-look of the Pa’lante Simple Pack, and another buddy is sending me his Pa’lante V2 to do the same, woot!) but anyway, yeah, full disclaimer, Six Moon Designs sent me the Minimalist free of charge, and with any obligations beyond reporting directly back to them my thoughts on what I like and did not like.

So onto my insights into the backpack, and down at the bottom of this article will be a video that I did while out on the packs maiden voyage.

Continue reading “Six Moon Designs ‘Minimalist’ Backpack, Initial Look”

2 Favorite Items From My Sponsors!

6911e4449792fb664d57803cce8d5005

Greetings Adventurers!

It seems it is time for the hiking blogosphere to start posting their “Christmas Lists” – I have already seen three or four just in the last week.

I had an article about 95% of the way¬†written, and decided to delete it and do something different. The idea pop’ed into my brain to write up ‘my favorite piece of gear from my sponsors‘, but the more I thought about that, the more I realized I just could not decide on a single piece of gear from a couple of my sponsors. For instance, I have over 2000 days of use with the¬†Montbell Dynamo Wind Pants¬†and my absolute love for the¬†Montbell U.L. Thermawrap Jacket¬†would make it impossible for me to pick between the two. (opps, guess I just gave away that companies two favorites, doh!). The same could be said of companies like Six Moon Designs and ZPacks. So I figured the only way I could make this happen is if I picked two pieces of gear from each company that sponsors me!

So, here we go, in alphabetical order!

Continue reading “2 Favorite Items From My Sponsors!”

Six Moon Designs (2015) “Fusion 65” Available For Pre-Order

Six Moon Designs (2015)

Hey all, a very brief post/announcement:

I rarely do product announcements via my website (half dozen times at at the most since I started hikelighter)… but the second generation Six Moon Designs “Fusion 65”¬†backpack was just¬†made available for pre-order a few hours ago.

The Fusion 65 backpack has been, without question, the #1 backpack that I have been waiting for¬†– and if you are wondering why, go read my thoughts about it on my “Gear of 2014” article.

I placed an order for mine as soon as I saw it become available.

Selected the “Gray” option with the “S-Curve” Shoulder Yoke!

This is going to be the¬†backpack that goes with me on my Mojave¬†Trail hike later this year¬†–¬†and likely throughout the 2016 hiking season (non sub-2267 gram trips¬†of course).

Anyway, super excited about this backpack being released… just wanted to share the news with everybody.

Head over to: http://www.sixmoondesigns.com/packs/104-2015-fusion-65.html

(updated: Sept 14, 2015)

My backpack has arrived and here is a quick walk-around video of the pack:

 

Here is an excellent video overview of the 2015 Fusion 50 by Tom Willard:

Six Moon Designs, Flight 30 Pack

Six Moon Designs ‚ÄėFlight 30‚Ä≤ in-use along the Bigfoot Trail in Northern California. Photo Credit: Brian Doyle
Six Moon Designs ‘Flight 30’ in-use along the Bigfoot Trail in Northern California.
Photo Credit: Brian Doyle

Greetings,

The Six Moon Designs ‘Flight 30¬†pack is one of the newest and most exciting backpack on the market for SUL hikers, runners, fastpackers, FKT’ers,¬†peak baggers, and those looking for a small volume backpack that can handle 10 pounds or so of gear and have very little, if zero, bouncing while moving fast down the trail.

It is clear that the market is getting ready for an explosion of new products for those individuals that move fast, move light, and need gear that, for the most part, did not exist even a half-decade ago. As more and more hikers have moved into the world of SUL, and even XUL, a necessity for good quality backpacks, that are themselves SUL in nature, are desperately needed. At the same time, as adventure racers, ultra runners, and ultra marathoners, are¬†discovering the joy, and sometimes pain, of pushing themselves even further, so too are they finding the need to be using backpacks rather than vests, in order to accommodate additional garments, required safety gear, and additional food for those going without resupply. For the last few years there has been a void in the market¬†– a near lack of any products in the 15 liters up to 35 liters of volume space. A few have come along but very few, and those that did were obviously designed by folks that just did not ‘get it’ and instead where just trying to tap into a market prematurely without doing the necessary research for what was needed.¬†Companies that have gotten it have, unfortunately, continued to produce products for either day-runners (in the form of vests from companies such as Ultimate Direction, Salomon and others) that do not offer enough volume, or are companies¬†(Montane, ZPacks, and others)¬†that use traditional backpack shoulder strap systems that just do not work for faster moving adventurers.

The Flight 30 was designed from the ground up to resolve these issues. The lead developer of the Flight 30 is¬†well respected and experienced long distance hiker, Brian Frankle, who is¬†also be an active trail runner. Ron Moak, the owner of Six Moon Designs shared this on BPL: “The Flight 30 was designed for ultra runners who need to carry enough gear to be able to spend a night out without suffering. To accomplish this, it needed to be larger than your typical running pack. However, it also couldn’t interfere with your normal running.1

Continue reading “Six Moon Designs, Flight 30 Pack”

12 Favorite Pieces of Hiking Gear for 2012

Greetings Hikers,

As the year comes to an end I felt it was time to look back and highlight my favorite pieces of hiking gear over the 2012 hiking season. Last year I did the same thing and I really enjoyed how it made me stop and really consider the truly exceptional pieces of gear that I had used over the year – and I¬†have done a lot of refinement to my gear lists over the last few years and for the most part have them where I want them. This year I am going to list 12 items rather then ten, because this is 20″12″, and I just have more items I want to highlight.

The below items are going to be listed in no specific order, so please do not think that I feel that the first item in the list is any more or any less a favorite piece of gear.

#1 – Six Moon Designs Skyscape X – You can read my review of this shelter¬†or head right over to their website. As is documented within my¬†SUL/XUL Fully Enclosed Solo Shelter Comparison, the Skyscape X is “the worlds lightest Total Shelter Weight one-piece fully enclosed shelter“. I first saw this shelter when I was on a hike with the owner of Six Moon Designs and almost instantly feel in love with it. I have bought two of them in the last year or so and would buy another one without thought or hesitation if I needed another shelter. I have never found any one piece shelter at this weight¬†(425 grams / 15 oz) that provides as much protection from the¬†weather.

#2 – ZPacks Waterproof Breathable Cuben Fiber Rain Jacket –¬†You can read my review of this jacket¬†and my follow-up article on it¬†or head right over to their website. There are rain jackets and then there are rain jackets. Some rain jackets are truly exceptional when it comes to breathablity. Some rain jackets are truly exceptional when it comes to weight. Other rain jackets are popular because of their price. This jacket from ZPacks is by far not the most breathable rain jacket in the world. It is nowhere near as breathable as the latest gore-tex nor the latest eVENT. This jacket is also not the most durable rain jacket in the world, and it falls in the middle of the price range for top end rain jackets. What this jacket has going for it is that it is the world lightest three layer rain jacket that is presently on the market. I have used this jacket for hundreds of miles in the rain, a couple of hours in the snow, in hail for twenty or so minutes, and on a day to day basis around town for months. I have bought two of them over the last year or so and some of the changes to the most recent versions have made this my defacto wind and rain jacket.

#3 – Icebreaker Men’s Bodyfit 260 Tech Top & Icebreaker Men’s Tech T Lite Short Sleeve Shirt¬†– My long time readers will know I just moved into the world of Icebreakers this year. I use to be a die-hard¬†Patagonia Capilene 3 user – and was for many years. The price-point of Icebreakers kept me away from them for many years. A sale on them early in the year was good enough that I picked up both the Tech T Lite shirt and the 260 Bodyfit. Together these two pieces of clothing have resulted in the best layer one and layer two setup I have ever used. By themselves they both have their weaknesses (and more weaknesses than positives) but when put together I have absolutely fallen in love with them.

#4 –¬†Inov-8 Trailroc 245 – These shoes, only on the market for a short part of this year, have become an absolute mainstay in my hiking life. For a number of years I have used the Inov-8 X-Talon 212 shoes. I loved their weight, I loved their traction, I loved their support. What I did not love about them was their (for me) narrow toe-box. With the introduction of the Trailroc 2012 series Inov-8 has introduced a larger (anatomical)¬†toe box. As I have said for years, there are times ¬†when performance and¬†functionality¬†matter more then weight. In this case I have added¬†33 grams (1.16 ounces) of additional weight to my shoes in order to have a shoe that can handle my toes swelling as I am pounding out the long mileage days. Absolutely worth the additional weight. I went with the 245’s over the 235’s because as a long distance hiker I felt the need for a rock plate was of higher¬†importance¬†than ten grams. I am glad that I did. The X-Talon 212’s had two shock zones and to have gone from two to none would have just not been fun.

#5 –¬†TrailDesigns Sidewinder &¬†Evernew Titanium Non-Stick 900ml Pot – Just going to be honest, adding twice the amount of weight to my setup in order to have a more versatile cooking setup was both a hard one, but an amazingly rewarding one. What I have discovered, as a long distance backwoods hiker, is that I have come to value food the more that I hike. I use to be somebody who could feel I was happy with eating idaho¬†potatoes¬†and top romin for days on end. Both of these could be made very easily with just hot water¬†– and honestly, most of the time I did not even heat up the water. But over the last year I have come to value and¬†appreciate¬†getting to camp and spending a few minutes sitting down and actually ‘making’ a real meal. Having a 900 ml pot allows me to make meals I could never make with a food in bag approach. I can sit there and chop up carrots and real¬†potatoes¬†and all kinds of other stuff and make a real meal, thanks to the larger pot. Yes, it means having a 5 ounce cook setup rather than a 2 ounce cook setup. The long term¬†physiological¬†effect of cooking a real meal more then makes up for those additional two or three ounces. The TrailDesigns Sidewinder is truly a magical cooking accessory. A pot stand and wind screen built into one. It rolls up and fits inside of my pot. Super easy. A bit expensive for what it does (my old pot stand and wind screen cost 25 bucks, versus 80 bucks for the sidewinder) but in this case, it is one of those times when the extra money is totally worth the all-in-one-ease-of-use-amazing-performance¬†factor that the Sidewinder provides. (ps: yes, sometimes I even take the pan-lid that is part of the 900ml pot… I take with me some dehydrated¬†o’brien potatoes and some EVOO and wow does it make an easy way to have a great breakfast.)

#6 –¬†ACR ResQLink 406 PLB –¬†This should be an obvious one. I have never actually had to use mine, but as a hiker that spends the vast majority of my time in the deep backwoods while building a new hiking trail,¬†130 grams worth of weight is something I do not even think about when it comes to overall life-safety. My PLB goes with me, without thought, without hesitation, without compromise.

#7 –¬†Suunto MC-2G Global Compass – This has been a fairly new upgrade for me. I use to use a smaller, lighter, less feature rich compass. But as time goes on I have found the addition of the features of this compass worth the extra weight. Most hikers would question having a compass with a mirror on it for most trails in America, but it has its value in some situations. Moreover the mirror can do double-duty to help me see the bottom of my feet if I have a bad blister that needs to be taken care of (very rare), and can also be used for tending to any facial cuts that I might get from trees or such. See my article¬†When bulk matters more than weight for more on my thoughts about this.

#8 –¬†Sawyer PointOne Squeeze Water Filter System –¬†Very little can be said herein that has not already been said about this product. The weight to¬†performance¬†of this filter makes it the¬†unquestionable¬†king of filters for hikers. Combined together with the Evernew Water Carry Bags and you have yourself the best 1.0 Absolute Micron filter on the planet with water bags that are durable enough to handle long term use when used properly.

#9 – Gossamer Gear¬†Lightrek 4 Trekking¬†Poles –¬†You can read my full review of these poles or head right over to their official website.¬†These poles continue to be an¬†exceptional¬†pair of hiking poles. Thousands and thousands of miles using them. I list them as my “favorite gossamer gear product” on my Gossamer Gear Trail Ambassador page for a reason: because they are the finest three-season hiking poles on the market from a weight to performance factor.

#10 – Black Rock Gear Vest – I am new to the world of hiking with vests rather then full on jackets, and the Black Rock Gear Vest has proven to me that vests have a place in a backpackers setup. Sadly the demand for these and the fact that Black Rock Gear is a small cottage company and the fact that sourcing material is often times hard, the availability of these vests have been extremely limited. I was lucky to get one from their last batches – and very glad I was able to get one!

#11 – Black Diamond Alpine Carbon Cork Trekking Poles –¬†You can read my short-term review of these poles or head right over to their official website. In my quest to find a four-season set of hiking poles, pretty much everybody I respect that I asked said these where the best ones out there. I gave them a go and have to agree. While significantly too heavy for summer time hiking (unless you are not a sul/xul hiker) these are freaking amazing bomb-proof trekking poles.

#12 – ZPacks Arc Blast Backpack – I have to be honest here and say that I have very few miles on this backpack. However once you have hiked a lot of miles you are able to very quickly know if a backpack is going to work for you or not. This year I have purchased 11 backpacks from three different cottage companies, most of them I used for less then 20 miles and just knew they were not going to work out. The Arc Blast reminds me a lot of the days when I had a ULA Circuit. It has the support and tough feeling factors that my normal non-frame cuben fiber backpacks lack. This should make it very nice for winter hiking and for those times when I am on the trail for 8 or 10 days between trail towns (note: I have not used this backpack in such a situation yet, as I only got it about a month ago, but one just knows these things.) Loaded up with all of my winter gear, this backpack feels like my load is around 4 pounds lighter then what I know it actually is – and that is sweet. I really look forward to using this backpack in 2013 in the deep backwoods of the Redwood forest. I was amazing¬†hesitant¬†to buy this (and did not buy it for over six months since it was released) because I had previously used hybrid cuben fiber backpacks from HMG¬†and found the material to be way overkill for me. In the end my decision for buying it was other hikers reporting the ability to load it up with a fair amount of weight and have it carry the load very well. So far with the limited use I have used it for, I too have been amazingly impressed. I do not understand the how or the why, and my previous ZPacks Blast with external supports did not carry the load good at all, but this backpack is a whole other story. I have had a few buddies try it with a full load and it has made them go “wow”, just like I did the first time I put it on. A ULA Circuit is still going to be more comfortable overall, but if you are willing to give up¬†26 ounces for just a little bit of comfort, which I am, this could be the go-to backpack for me for the foreseeable future while I am long distance hiking. Only time spent on the trail will truly show if all of this is true or not.

 

 

Have you posted a “favorite gear of 2012 article”?? If so post a comment with a link to it so I and others can check out your favorite gear!!

 

 

In accordance of USA Federal Trade Commission 16 CFR, Part 255: I hereby declare that I am a ‚ÄúTrail Ambassador‚ÄĚ of Gossamer Gear. The Gossamer Gear products mentioned within the content of this review were purchased by myself and were not supplied to me free of charge, or in exchange for services, by Gossamer Gear, unless¬†otherwise¬†mentioned. I hereby declare that I am a “Sponsor” of Black Rock Gear.¬†The Black Rock Gear¬†products mentioned within the content of this review were purchased by myself and were not supplied to me free of charge, or in exchange for services, by Black Rock Gear, unless¬†otherwise¬†mentioned. Any other¬†product(s) mentioned within the content of this review is free of endorsement(s) between myself and the manufacturer(s) and meets all FTC 16 CFR.255 compliance requirements. (i envy those of you who live in countries where these stupid disclaimers are not required by law to include in articles)

Two-person Sub 900 gram Fully Enclosed Shelters

Greetings Hiker,

A number of months back I wrote an article and corresponding spreadsheet which went into detail many of the lightest fully enclosed solo shelters on the market. It quickly and to my surprise, became a sort of de facto reference guy for hikers around the world. Since it was published I have received countless requests to put together a similar article that focused on two person shelters. So a number of months ago I started working on compiling the mass amount of data that is required to put together an article and spreadsheet of this kind. It has taken me much longer than I expected it would, but I am now ready to release this.

I think it is important to note a few things from the very start.

First is the fact that I had initially set some minimum and maximum weight limits for the chart and have had to change it along the way. I asked the public for feedback and asked many cottage owners for feedback regarding this as well. It was wonderful. I have, however, made slight modifications to the maximum weight limit that will be focused on within the chart. Details of why are explained below. What I would like to mention is that I have received an amazing amount of feedback from almost all of the cottage owners. It has been an honor and pleasure.

Next aspect to note is the fact that this is not an all-encompassing list of the lightest two person shelters in the world.

There are a number of reasons for this, but the two primary reasons are:

(1) I initially set some criteria for what the spreadsheet would be based on in regards to Total Shelter Weight. Along the way the maximum weight changed a few times, all as a result of the list of shelters becoming much too long to detail them all; it would have taken countless hours of work. As it is this article has consumed a little over 65 hours of work and over two hundred emails.  There simply had to come a point where I was forced to reduce the maximum weight limit in order to reduce the amount of work, the complicated, and length of the spreadsheet. When I started this article there were a number of shelters that I wanted to include but they ended up being well over 1300 grams Total Shelter Weight Рand if I were to include them than people would make the case that I should have included others in the same weight category, and a list which is already long enough would have become three to four times longer. I very much respect these cottage companies out there producing amazing two person shelters that are in the 1000-1200 gram range, make no mistake about it.

(2) There are a number of companies out there that fail(ed) to provide the true weights of their shelters. Most of them simply do not list accurate Total Shelter Weights on their website. There were around a half-dozen companies that I emailed asking for accurate numbers on their shelters and they never responded. I would be doing a dis service to my readers to pull numbers out of nowhere and use them just for the sake of including a specific shelter. Companies that do not publish exact weights of their shelters are doing nothing but losing business. I can say that for a fact, as last year I was looking at one specific shelter that I really wanted, but the company fails to list accurate weights of their shelters. Rather than dealing with the back-and-forth emails to try to get it out of them, I simply moved on and purchased a shelter from another cottage manufacture.  So again, there are a few shelters on the market that I highly suspect might be less than 900 grams, and even more under 1300 grams, but because they fail to provide technical details about their shelters on their websites, and in many cases never responded to my emails, their shelters are not within the chart. I make no excuse for this. I simply will not make up numbers on my own because a company is unwilling to provide information that their customers should have.

Continue reading “Two-person Sub 900 gram Fully Enclosed Shelters”